Take quiz

Is someone you know experiencing domestic abuse

Are you worried that someone you know may be experiencing domestic abuse?

(Including ‘honour’ abuse)

Results

You answered ‘Yes‘ to at least one question (see below). This means that you know someone who may be experiencing or at risk of domestic abuse or violence, including honour abuse, forced marriage and FGM. We have outlined some basic steps (below) that you can take to support to a friend, family member, colleague, neighbour or anyone you know who may be experiencing abuse. You can also call Refuge’s National Domestic Abuse Helpline for free, confidential support, 24 hours a day on 0808 2000 247. Visit the helpline website for information on how to support a friend. If you feel that the person or their children are in danger you should call the Police on 999.

You answered ‘No‘ to all the questions (see below).

This does not mean that the person is not experiencing or at risk of domestic abuse or violence, including honour abuse, forced marriage and FGM.

We have outlined some basic steps (below) that you can take to support to a friend, family member, colleague, neighbour or anyone you know who may be experiencing abuse.

You can also call Refuge’s National Domestic Abuse Helpline for free, confidential support, 24 hours a day on 0808 2000 247. Visit the helpline website for information on how to support a friend.

If you feel that the person or their children are in danger you should call the Police on 999.

Next

#1. Have you noticed any physical injuries?

Next

#2. Have you noticed a change in the persons mood?

Next

#3. Has the person changed the way they look?

Next

#4. Does the person complain of having limited access to money?

Next

#5. Has the persons alcohol, prescription drug, or illegal substance use increased?

Next

#6. Has the persons attendance or performance at work/education been poor?

Next

#7. Does the persons partner seem to control them?

Next

#8. Is the person making/receiving an unusual number of phone calls/texts?

Next

#9. Have there been disruptive personal visits to the workplace/place of education?

Next

#10. Is there evidence of family disputes?

Next

#11. Is the person going or about to go through a separation?

Next

#12. Do the parents or other family members restrict the persons behaviour?

Next

#13. Does the person have siblings who left education to marry early?

Next

#14. Has the person ever been reported missing to the police with no explanation?

Next

#15. Are preparations are being made for a child to take a long holiday?

Next

#16. Does the person fear that they may be taken out of education?

Next

#17. Has a child’s behaviour changed after a prolonged absence from school?

Next

#18. Is a child or young woman experiencing health problems?

Finish

Exit this page at any time by closing your browser window.

One in four women and one in six men will experience domestic abuse in their lifetimes. This means that there is a high probability that you know someone who is experiencing domestic abuse. A mother, sister, work, college or university colleague, cousin or friend may be suffering in silence. If the person isn’t open about their abuse, it may make it difficult for you to acknowledge the problem directly.

It can be hard to know how to support a friend or loved one who is experiencing domestic abuse. Intervening directly can be dangerous for the victim and you.

If you are concerned about someone, take this short quiz to help you decide what to do next and how you might offer support.

Support someone experiencing domestic abuse tips

If you are worried that someone you know is a victim of domestic abuse, you can call Refuge’s National Domestic Abuse Helpline for free, confidential support, 24 hours a day on 0808 2000 247. Visit the helpline website for information on how to support a friend.

If you or someone you know is in immediate danger call 999

Cover Your Tracks – How to clear (delete) your browser history